Communications 2000

Assignment #13 - Tracking Down Answers #4
Answers

To review my answer to any question on this assignment, click on the question for which you want an answer in the table below.

How old was Betsy Ross when she died? If everyone in the U.S. gave you a penny, how many dollars would you receive?
How many possible Gregorian calendars are there? How many Presidential elections have occurred under the U.S. Constitution?
What was the last year we used this year’s Gregorian calendar?  
  1. How old was Betsy Ross when she died?        (return to the top of this page)

What you probably need to know

  1. The date Betsy Ross was born.
  2. The date Betsy Ross died.
  3. How to calculate a person's age from the two dates above.

My answers

  1. Betsy Ross was born on January 1, 1752.
  2. Betsy Ross died on January 30, 1836.
  3. To get her age at death, you subtract the year she was born from the year she died.  If, in the year she died, she had not celebrated her birthday, you subtract 1 from your answer.
  4. Betsy Ross' age when she died was: 1836-1752 = 84

Citation

Title: Microsoft Encarta 2000 Deluxe Encyclopedia
Publisher: Microsoft Corporation
Publication date: 1999
Topic found: Betsy Ross

  1. If everyone in the U.S. gave you a penny, how many dollars would you receive?        (return to the top of this page)

What you probably need to know

  1. The population of the U.S.
  2. The number of pennies in one dollar.
  3. How to calculate what you'd receive from the two numbers above.

My answers

  1. The population of the U.S. on April 1, 1990 was 248,765,170.
  2. There are 100 pennies in a dollar.
  3. To calculate what I'd receive, I need to divide the population by 100.  This is because I would get $1 from every 100 people.  I therefore need to know how many groups of 100 there are.
  4. I'd receive: 248765170 / 100 = $2,487,651.70

Citation

Title: The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000
Publisher: World Almanac Books, an imprint of PRIMEDIA Reference Inc.
Publication date: 1999
page(s): 386

To find this page I looked in the index for "Population, U.S.".

  1. How many Presidential elections have occurred under the U.S. Constitution?        (return to the top of this page)

What you probably need to know

  1. The year the 1st presidential election took place after the adoption of the Constitution.
  2. The year the last U.S. presidential election took place.
  3. How often U.S. presidential elections occur.
  4. How to calculate the number from the figures above.

My answers

  1. The first presidential election under our current Constitution took place in 1789.
  2. There last U.S. presidential election was in 1996.  (This year's will take place next November 7.)
  3. The Constitution provides that presidential terms will be 4 years.
  4. To calculate the number of presidential elections, I need to subtract the year of the first election from that of the last, divide by 4 and round off to the nearest whole number, then add one.  Alternatively, I could count the number of elections listed in the Almanac.
  5. 1996 - 1789 =  207 / 4 = 51.75 = 52 + 1 = 53

Citation

Title: The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000
Publisher: World Almanac Books, an imprint of PRIMEDIA Reference Inc.
Publication date: 1999
page(s): 502

To find this page I looked in the index for "Elections, U.S.", then beneath that for "Presidential".

  1. How many possible Gregorian calendars are there?        (return to the top of this page)

What you probably need to know

  1. What a Gregorian calendar is.
  2. How to determine the potential for different ones.

My answers

  1. We defined the Gregorian calendar as part of our discussion of Assignment #10.  Alternatively, you could look up the term in any dictionary.
  2. You have two options.
  1. Look up Gregorian Calendar in the Almanac.  You'll find the number of possibilities shown as a perpetual calendar in most.
  2. You could think it through.
  1. 14  This is the number shown as possible in the Perpetual Calendar.  But it also is logical.  There are only 7 days of the week.  Therefore, once you know the day of the week any given year begins, you can determine when each subsequent day of that year falls.  However, there are 14 possible calendars, not 7, because of leap years.  In leap years the dates after February 28 fall on different days of the week than they would in non-leap years.  Thus we have an additional 7 possible calendars in a perpetual calendar.

Citation

Title: The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000
Publisher: World Almanac Books, an imprint of PRIMEDIA Reference Inc.
Publication date: 1999
page(s): 328-330

To find these pages I looked in the index for "Gregorian calendar".  I could also have found them by looking for "Calendar", then beneath that for "Gregorian".

  1. What was the last year we used this year’s Gregorian calendar?        (return to the top of this page)

What you probably need to know

  1. What a Gregorian calendar is.
  2. How to determine the potential for different ones.
  3. How to use the perpetual calendar you'll find in the almanac.

My answers

  1. We defined the Gregorian calendar as part of our discussion of Assignment #10.  Alternatively, you could look up the term in any dictionary.
  2. You have two options.
  1. Look up Gregorian Calendar in the Almanac.  You'll find the number of possibilities shown as a perpetual calendar in most.
  2. You could think it through, as we did in the previous question.
  1. Look up 2000 in the table preceding the calendar list.  Note the calendar number used in 2000.  Scan backwards in the list until you find that number again.  Look to the left to see its year.
  2. 1972

Citation

Title: The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000
Publisher: World Almanac Books, an imprint of PRIMEDIA Reference Inc.
Publication date: 1999
page(s): 328-330

To find these pages I looked in the index for "Gregorian calendar".  I could also have found them by looking for "Calendar", then beneath that for "Gregorian".